Enoch George Howard

Samuel Cole

Samuel Cole is found first in a census in 1850, age 29, living in the home of Washington Hodge, a blacksmith and property owner. Samuel is listed as a “post and railer” with real property valued at $100. He is in the Cracklin District. In 1860 he is a “fence maker” living in Mechanicsville [Olney], with an apparent wife and three children. He is listed as having no real property but having personal property valued at $400. In 1863 he is on the list of those eligible for military service for Montgomery County. In 1870 he is living in Brighton, listed as a farmer with real property valued at $800 dollars. The 1880 the census says he is living in Olney, again working as a farmer.

Samuel Cole

Samuel Cole

Samuel Cole is found first in a census in 1850, age 29, living in the home of Washington Hodge, a blacksmith and property owner. Samuel is listed as a “post and railer” with real property valued at $100. He is in the Cracklin District. In 1860 he is a “fence maker” living in Mechanicsville [Olney], with an apparent wife and three children. He is listed as having no real property but having personal property valued at $400. In 1863 he is on the list of those eligible for military service for Montgomery County. In 1870 he is living in Brighton, listed as a farmer with real property valued at $800 dollars. The 1880 the census says he is living in Olney, again working as a farmer.

E. Elkhorn

E. Elkhorn
Edward Elkhorn
(b. 1820 – d. 1912)

William “Edward” Elkhorn was born June 6, 1820 in Montgomery County to Philip Elkhorn and Rebecca C. Briscoe. Phillip Elkhorn, an enslaved person, was sold south on the ship Brunswick, which was owned by Austin Woolfolk. The Brunswick departed Baltimore on October 11, 1831.

Elkhorn worked as a small farmer in the Berry’s District of Montgomery County. Edward Elkhorn was married first to a woman named Elizabeth and together they had four children Charles and John (who were likely twins because they are the same age), Henry and Rosen. In 1849, Edward Elkhorn and his mother Charlotte Briscoe purchased from Benjamin and Margaret Hallowell a plot of land in Olney, Hallowell was the president of the Maryland Agricultural College from 1859 to 1860, serving only one month.

Elkhorn married for the second time a woman named Sarah Butler (b. circa 1835) on August 24, 1865. Butler worked as a servant in Sandy Spring for Warrick Miller and his family prior to marrying Edward Elkhorn. Edward and Sarah lived in Olney with their children: Tilghman, Levi, Charles, Edward, Perry, Philip, and Agnes. Edward Elkhorn could not read or write but sent his children to school where they would be educated. The Elkhorn family were members of the Sharp Street Church. Edward Elkhorn was the neighbor of Arnold Waters, another free black landowner in the community. Elkhorn purchased two additional parcels of land in 1873 from William H. Stabler, attorney for James E. Tyson, for the sum of $880. In 1900 and 1910 the Elkhorns were living in Olney, MD and Edward was still working as a farmer at the age of 88. Edward Elkhorn died January 22, 1912 and is buried at the Sharp Street Cemetery.

A. Waters


A. Waters
Arnold Waters
(b. 1810 – d. 1889)

Arnold Waters was the son of Nicholas Waters. Nicholas Waters appears first in the census records for Montgomery County in 1810. He was born about 1772-1779. He is last seen in the Frederick County census in 1870 with what appears to be a second wife. His first wife was Katy Waters. Nicholas bought Katy (age 44) and all her children (5), to wit: Anna (16), Arnold (15), Kitty (13), Urania (10), Sarah Ann (8), Amelia (presumably his children) from John Waters. He freed them in 1832. They are reportedly on the 1832 Sheriff O’Neale list of free persons of color for Montgomery County. In 1850 Nicholas had property valued at $100; in 1860, $500. In 1850 he lived in the Berry’s District. His daughter Sarah married Samuel Owens of nearby Davis Corner.

Water’s presumed father, Nicholas Waters, bought his freedom from John Waters in 1832. In 1832 he was counted with other family members on Sheriff O’Neale’s list of free persons of color in Montgomery County. According to the census, he was a laborer, living in the Berry’s District, though not with his father. There are no personal or real property values listed for him. Thus, he does not appear to have had any property of his own in 1850. In 1860 Arnold and his family have moved to Olney. His occupation is now listed as “farmer.” In 1880 he is listed as “small farmer,” then married to Amelia Contee. Their children were: Samuel T., Hannah, Margaret, John E., Charles, Benjamin, Arnold Jr., Sarah, Henry, Mary Ann, and William Arthur.

In 1880 all the children except Hannah, Margaret and John E. were living with Arnold and Amelia. Hannah married William Grinton in Washington DC. They continued to live in DC. No additional information is known at this time about Margaret. John married Elizabeth Pratt and continued to live in Olney, raising two children, Elsie and Harold William. Arnold died September 11, 1889. He is buried in the Mutual Memorial Cemetery in Sandy Spring.

The land noted on the map was originally Nicholas Waters’ land. The notation “A. Waters,” in 1865 probably indicates that Nicholas had moved (to Frederick, per 1870 census) and Arnold had taken over the property. There was no information regarding any property sales in the time period. Nothing is noted in the grantor or grantee indexes for Montgomery County for this time period.

S. Owens

S. Owens
Samuel Owens
(b. circa 1819 – d. 1866)

Samuel Owens, a mulatto, born circa 1825, was probably a free-born black. Owens appears on the census for the first time in 1840 and is listed in a household with one adult male, one adult female, and one minor child. On August 18, 1850 Samuel Owens purchased a part of the tract of land called “Addition to Charley Forrest” from Caleb and Henrietta Bentley. By 1854 Samuel Owens extended his land by purchasing another lot from an unknown source but received a receipt from someone named E. G. Brown.

Owens was married by Thomas McCormick to Sarah Waters and they lived in with their children: Albert, Hannah, Elizabeth, Samuel, Laura, Anna, and Sarah. Samuel Owens and his wife Sarah were both trustees of the Sharp Street Church where they also worshipped. Many of the free blacks in Sandy Spring worshipped at the Sharp Street Church and served as trustees. In 1863 Samuel Owens was drafted into the Union Army during the Civil War. He was a member of the 2nd Regiment, Company C, Maryland Cavalry, serving from August 12, 1863 – February 6, 1864. When he entered service, he ranked in as a private and when he mustered out he ranked as a corporal. Samuel Owens’ health began to fail him and he died in January 1866. In his will Samuel Owens left all of his land to his wife and children to be divided.